What is Dolomite Powder?

28 comments

Dolomite powder is a very inexpensive and useful calcium supplement for adding to coconut milk tonic, quick broths, and other beverages. Be sure to purchase the powder, not the tablets. One teaspoon contains the calcium provided by one quart of milk.

I purchased KAL dolomite powder and found that it dissolves well and is a great price too. Please note that this is an affiliate link and I get a very tiny % of each sale. This is the brand of dolomite powder that Sally Fallon recommends in the Eat Fat Lose Fat book resources section.

Here is an excerpt from the EFLF offical site FAQ about dolomite powder and heavy metals:

Q: I love using your Coconut Milk Tonic as an alternative to milk–I am very allergic to milk, even raw milk. But the tonic contains dolomite as a calcium source and I am concerned about reports of toxic metal contamination “of many randomly selected and analyzed dolomite supplements”  S.T.

A: Dolomite is a rock substance that was used by traditional peoples, and is also an ingredient in many calcium supplement pills. KAL, producers of the product we recommend, reports that the legal amount of heavy metals including lead is 3 parts per million. The KAL product tests for 1 part per billion. If it is more than 1 part per billion, the batch is rejected. Note that the pdr site says “many” randomly selected supplements, not all. Dolomite is a very inexpensive source of calcium and may represent competition to other more expensive supplements. Hence, the bad press about contamination.

Here is the full label for the 16 ounce KAL Dolomite Powder:

Directions: take 1 teaspoon mixed into beverages or food. More palatable if mixed with milk, milk shakes, yogurt, yogurt shakes, homemade pasta, casseroles, baked goods, meat loaf or vegetable loaf. Store in a cool, dry place.

Warning: Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6. Keep this product out of reach of children. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately.

Supplement Facts
serving size: 1 teaspoon (5g)
Servings per container: 90 (for the 16 ounce bottle)

Calcium (as Calcium Carbonate from Dolomite Powder) 1100mg amt/serving 110% Daily value
Iron - 2 mg amt/serving 11% Daily value
Magnesium (as Magnesium Carbonate from Dolomite Powder) 630mg amt/serving 158% Daily value

Other ingredients: NONE

Discussion: Calcium and Magnesium provide nutritive support for normal, healthy bones and teeth, proper nerve impulse transmission and muscle contraction. Phosphorus-Free. Iron provides nutritive support for healthy oxygen utilization.

KAL guarantees that NO ingredients other than those listed on this label have been added to this product.

Packaged by weight, not volume. Some settling of contents may occur.

 

 

PAID ENDORSEMENT DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

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{ 24 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Tina~ November 23, 2010 at 9:59 pm

HI,
This sounds like it might be a great option for us in winter months when milk is less plentiful. Could you list the ingredients in teh KAL dolomite powder as it’s shown on the label? We have some allergy issues so I wanted to check before I bought…
Thanks!

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2 Kim November 23, 2010 at 10:23 pm

Great question! Here is the full label for the 16 ounce KAL Dolomite Powder:

Directions: take 1 teaspoon mixed into beverages or food. More palatable if mixed with milk, milk shakes, yogurt, yogurt shakes, homemade pasta, casseroles, baked goods, meat loaf or vegetable loaf. Store in a cool, dry place.

Warning: Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6. Keep this product out of reach of children. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately.

Supplement Facts
serving size: 1 teaspoon (5g)
Servings per container: 90 (for the 16 ounce bottle)

Calcium (as Calcium Carbonate from Dolomite Powder) 1100mg amt/serving 110% Daily value
Iron - 2 mg amt/serving 11% Daily value
Magnesium (as Magnesium Carbonate from Dolomite Powder) 630mg amt/serving 158% Daily value

Other ingredients: NONE

Discussion: Calcium and Magnesium provide nutritive support for normal, healthy bones and teeth, proper nerve impulse transmission and muscle contraction. Phosphorus-Free. Iron provides nutritive support for healthy oxygen utilization.

KAL guarantees that NO ingredients other than those listed on this label have been added to this product.

Packaged by weight, not volume. Some settling of contents may occur.

Reply

3 Diana November 28, 2010 at 7:23 pm

I’m wondering what the dolomite is from. Is it like a vitamin in powdered form with ONLY the calcium, iron, magnesium? Or is dolomite an actual compound found in nature? Anyone know?

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4 Kim November 28, 2010 at 7:57 pm

Yes, dolomite is the actual mineral found in the earth. There are dolomite deposits all over the world. I found this additional info on the EFLF website FAQs:

Dolomite is a rock substance that was used by traditional peoples, and is also an ingredient in many calcium supplement pills. KAL, producers of the product we recommend, reports that the legal amount of heavy metals including lead is 3 parts per million. The KAL product tests for 1 part per billion. If it is more than 1 part per billion, the batch is rejected. Note that the pdr site says many randomly selected supplements, not all. Dolomite is a very inexpensive source of calcium and may represent competition to other more expensive supplements. Hence, the bad press about contamination.

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5 Diana December 4, 2010 at 1:29 am

Woot! Found dolomite powder at my local co-op! Same stuff available on Amazon! About same price too, just didn’t need to pay shipping!

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6 Melissa December 14, 2010 at 10:55 pm

I’m not sure I agree with using dolomite as a calcium supplement, but I have not done THOROUGH research about it, so please correct me if I’m wrong. Aside from the heavy metal toxicity issues, Dolomite contains calcium carbonate which is relatively insoluble and difficult for the body to absorb. Why not go with foods rich in calcium, or a whole food supplement like Genesis Today’s 4Total Calcium, or simply another form of calcium that is better absorbed by the body and does not have any risk of heavy metals contamination?

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7 tamar December 22, 2010 at 8:12 pm

hi melissa, was thinking the same re calcium source. do you think using seaweed would be a good substitute to dolomite??

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8 tamar December 22, 2010 at 8:10 pm

is dolomite powder a type of clay?? does it detox heavy metals by binding to them?? i am asking this because i am breast feeding and wondering if dolomite would be safe for me and my baby at the moment, dont want to detox heavy metals while breast feeding!!

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9 Phocion Timon January 19, 2011 at 8:34 pm

Dolomite is a naturally occurring mineral containing calcium, magnesium, and CO3 (carbonate). It is usually found as Ca(Mg)CO3.

It is most often formed as a secondary mineral: it is first deposited as limestone, CaCO3 (calcite), at the bottom of an ocean. After, and sometimes during, deposition the element Magnesium gets into the limestone and replaces some or most of the Calcium in the molecular structure turning the limestone into dolomite. (The correct term for dolomite found in Nature is dolostone.) Found as an oceanic deposit, it will not be pure dolomite but will have all the impurities associated with formation in an ocean, thus the name “dolostone.”

I cannot speak of this dietary dolomite (I am a geologist and dolomite, a.k.a. dolostone, and limestone are the two major carbonates in which oil and gas are found). Assuming it is collected from a hillside or a mine, such as salt mining, it would have to go through a purification process unless it is actually made in a laboratory as a food-grade “dolomite.”

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10 Karend June 16, 2011 at 6:21 am

Hi there,

I, too, use KAL’s Dolomite, but am concerned about the form of calcium, which is calcium carbonate. As near as I can tell, this is the same form of calcium that is used in TUMS – not the most bioavailable source. I bought a bottle to try it because it’s cheap, easy and contains the perfect ratio of calcium to magnesium. But whether or not it is more avaiable than a different variety like citrate or ?, I don’t know. With all of the profit-driven corruption that exists in the market now days, it pays to look only at independent studies.
Like Melissa said below, calcium can be taken in the form of greens. Top of the list is collards and broccoli leaves. Not matter what calcium supplement I finally settle on, I will always take advantage of the green sources, too.

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11 R. Alicia November 24, 2011 at 9:02 pm

Sally & Mary (not sure who wrote this one :)),

Personally I have been using CalciAIM. It’s citrus powder that you mix with water to get free ionic calcium and bioavailable nutrients essential to its absorption. Their site is http://www.calciaim.com.

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12 don December 4, 2011 at 8:48 am

I take dolomite powder because it’s a cheap and good source of Calcium AND Magnesium. However, I eat a lot of raw cheese and raw milk. I don’t do bone broths because I don’t have the time. I’m concerned about my Cal/Mag ratio that should either be 1:1 or 2:1 depending on which source you listen to. So I am wondering if I have too much calcium. If I cut out the dolomite and take a Magnesium supplement then I woud habe to drink 4 eight ounce glasses of raw milk (300 mg. per 8 ounce galss) a day to get to the recommended level for my age. What would you do?

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13 scott December 22, 2013 at 1:52 am

Use a pressure cooker. It’s a lot quicker.

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14 Rich December 4, 2011 at 8:58 am

Seaweed and greens are NOT good sources of Calcium.

Who told you that Cal Carbonate is not as absorbable as others? A vitamin company that processes Citrate and Malate?

At least one of you start out by saying it’s less absorbable and in the next breath say that you don’t know of it is less absorbable or not. Think before you commenet!

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15 Rich December 4, 2011 at 9:05 am

I meant to say Citrate, lactate and glucanate, not malate

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16 Tim March 6, 2012 at 8:56 am

I heard toxic mercury sulphide (HgS) often co-crystallizes with dolomite in nature. I also heard that manufacturers don’t have to list other minerals in their products under a certain amount. I feel it’s best to get your nutrients through a well balanced diet and be wary of supplements. Studies often show that they do more harm then good. “An Apple A Day” by Joe Schwarcz is a good reference book on food from a chemist’s perspective.

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17 Roy Jensen April 9, 2012 at 5:01 pm

My wife was realieved of the bone spirs in her feet by taking dolomite with magnesium within 4 months. At that time my teeth were very bad. I took the same medication and the remaining teeth that I had became very healthy and I haven’t lost any since. I have taken it ever since all of that time. (That was 45 years ago!) I recomend this product. Thanks for the oportunity to tell my story!

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18 Roy Jensen April 9, 2012 at 5:37 pm

I chew up my dolomite tabs with 6 apricot kernels each day. (Why?)
Because then I won’t get canser! I got this tip by reading a book called world withot cancer. It is a documented work about vitimine B-17. (or lieatril) I may have misspelled that! I hope you can still find it on the shelves. I’m 84 years old by the way. You can buy apricot kernals at
(Follow your heart) in Canoga Park C.A.

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19 shirley smith October 11, 2012 at 8:18 pm

I need dolomite powder that does not have anything added. Recently I bought some that had sharp little chystals in it. I use this product for debriding the face, and the sharp chrystals hurt the skin. Can you tell me if this product is pure??

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20 P.VINAYAGAM December 5, 2012 at 5:57 am

Dear Sir,

Please send me the details for dolomite purity analysis details.

Thanks and regards,

vinayagam.p.

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21 Brian Hodgson April 10, 2013 at 9:45 pm

I am a 72 year old runner. In August 2011 I had an Aorta Valve replaced.
I have a slight irregular heart rythem. My cardiologist put me on Mag/Min
tablets. My friend gave me a bag of ‘dolomite’ powder, which I know has a high concentrate of Magnesium. Would it be safe to use instead of the tablets?
Kind Regards
Brian

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22 eat healthy facts kids June 5, 2013 at 5:16 am

Great stage C. August. I think people need to remember that the Leangains approach does not mean paleo approach.
The way in which I interpret Leangains is that it really is for someone who is trying to consider their body towards the
next level. I believe it really is fair to say that someone who is overweight
and hunting to shed fat would have a lot success on the “paleo” method
by restricting carbohydrate (significantly like Richard).
This would not demand calorie counting or worrying also considerably
about macronutrient ratios.

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23 Mollen Rinomhota July 1, 2013 at 12:25 pm

good info

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24 Scott February 10, 2014 at 12:21 pm

Interesting article. It would be better if you or KAL would provide some actual documentation for the claims. I reviewed KAL’s website and found no statement about the purity of their product at all. It’s likely that they are testing for it, and could improve the reception of their product if they were to release that information.

However, I am confident that the amount of lead present is consistent with those concentrations found in all natural calcium sources.

I’ve been using the KAL dolomite powder for supplementation for some time. I recommend taking it mixed with equal amounts of ascorbic acid powder (Vitamin C) in water. This improves its solubility and makes high doses of Vitamin C more tolerable to the digestive tract.

Essentially, mixing these forms Calcium ascorbate and magnesium ascorbate, which are easily assimilated by the body. The dose of Vitamin C with the dolomite also gives the added assurance that any lead naturally present in the product will be chelated by the ascorbate and may be prevented from being absorbed.

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